How To Design A Recipe – Step 7 Final Step

So to finish off this series we are going to create a few recipes to show what we have learned.  We have gone through a lot and now it’s time to test the knowledge and put into some practical use.

First off let’s do an American Pale Ale

(The Sweet Nectar Of Life)

Starting off with flavor from specialty grains.  I would like it to have a bready flavor, kinda sweet with a biscuit after flavor and good head retention.  So with that said I’m going to go with:

Munich Malt – bready flavor kinda sweet

Victory – Biscuit flavor

Carapils – head retention.

I want good head retention and a bready flavor so that will be more then the biscuit will be in the back ground.

.5 lb Carapils

.5 lb Munich Malt

.25 lb carapils

I want a 5ish% for the ABV so it can be drank easily.  So that means

 (This can happen if you have too many brews over 5%, you turn into, “that guy”)

7 lbs LME or 6 lbs DME (Malt Extract Post Has Got This Info In It)

So what we have right now is:

.5 lb Carapils

.5 lb Munich Malt

.25 lb carapils

7 lbs LME or 6 lbs DME

Next let’s do the hops.  An American Pale Ale needs American hops.

.5 oz Galena 60min

1 oz Cascade  5min

Those hops will give a classic American Hop flavor as well as aroma.

Now for the yeast.  For anything American, a classic strain of yeast is California 001, so that is what we are going to use.

So the recipe looks like this.

5 lb Carapils

.5 lb Munich Malt

.25 lb carapils

7 lbs LME or 6 lbs DME

.5 oz Galena 60min

1 oz Cascade 5min

California 001

And that is a recipe for a pale ale.

To try one more, let’s do brown ale.

Same process.  I want this beer to be sweet darker, malty and have nutty flavors.   For that we’ll choose 60L crystal, toasted malt which we will have to make and victory malt.

To make toasted malt take 2-row and put it in the oven at 300 for 15 minutes.  Around this time you will smell it turning nutty.  Some might say that you need to keep it in a paper bag and let it, “mellow” out in time but truth be told with regular toasted malt I have had no trouble using it right away.

To really have that biscuit flavor you would want to use M.O for base malt, for extract you will just need to add a bit more of the victory to it to make it taste biscuit like.  So the specialty grains will look like this.

.75 lbs Victory

. 5 lbs 60L Crystal Malt

.25 lbs Toasted Malt

As far as the malt extract typically browns are a bit lighter in the ABV department.  So lets shoot for 4.5%. That will be about 5 lbs DME.  We are going to use golden light because we are using specialty grains and don’t need any other flavors.

So for the recipe looks like:

.75 lbs Victory

. 5 lbs 60L Crystal Malt

.25 lbs Toasted Malt

5 lbs DME Golden light

Now off to the hops.  We want earthy hops from the European region.  The hops we are going to use are Kent goldings and fuggles.

1 oz Fuggles (60min)

1 oz East Kent Golding (15min)

As far as yeast goes, your choices are 002 English Ale, 005 British Ale, 013 London Ale, 023 Burton Ale.  For me I have become a really big fan of 013 London Ale yeast.  It makes a pretty leveled out beer which is malty enough to bring out the British Style. So the recipe looks like.

.75 lbs Victory

. 5 lbs 60L Crystal Malt

.25 lbs Toasted Malt

5 lbs DME Golden light

1 oz Fuggles (60min)

1 oz East Kent Golding (15min)

London Ale Yeast 013.

With all recipes they pretty much follow the normal set up of take 2.5 gallons of water, heat up to 150 steep grains for 30min then take out add malt extract.  You don’t have to add all of your malt extract to the beer in the beginning there is a reason why you can and some might say should add it in two different sections.  We do have a post about it.
When you see the number in time next to the hop that means the amount of time the hops are boiled for.

So that sums up our recipe series.  Hope you enjoyed and now feel confident on how to build your own recipes.

Cheers

 

Related Post

Design A Recipe 1

Design A Recipe 2

Design A Recipe 3

Design A Recipe 4

Design A Recipe 5

Design A Recipe 6

 

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7 Comments on “How To Design A Recipe – Step 7 Final Step”

  1. brewman906 Says:

    what kind of lme or dme would you use in the american would it be light or golden or does it not matter really lol

    Reply

    • Jay's Brewing Blog Says:

      Light is usually golden light. Sometimes they call it pale also it is the same as golden light. Unless they say “extra light”, assume it’s golden light. Extra light is pils. Hope that answers your question. let me know if you have any others.

      Reply

  2. Daspoopen Says:

    Ok gotcha. Could I have your email? I have some questions I would like to ask you.

    Reply

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  1. How To Design Your Own Beer Recipe – Step 6 – Yeast | Jay's Brewing Blog - March 6, 2012

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